Frequently Asked Questions

Freshmen

Department of Psychology: Frequently Ask Question for Freshmen 

Welcome to Emory, your academic home for the next four years!  These next four years will offer you the opportunity to advance your intellectual horizons and experience personal growth.  Along the way, we hope that you will find room in your schedule to take a psychology course to learn more about this fascinating discipline.  Freshman frequently have a number of general questions about psychology courses and the psychology major.

 1)  Suppose I took the AP or IB class and Emory College has given me academic credit for that class, what does that mean?

  • What that means is that you have received credit for the material presented in Psych 111:  Intro to Psychology II.  You have also earned some credit for the History, Society, Cultures GER (HSC).  It means that you may NOT take Psych 111 on the Emory campus; that would be 6 hours of academic credit for 3 hours of work.  Emory frowns on this.  You may take Psych 110:  Introduction to Psychology I.

 2)  Suppose I took the AP/IB class and either didn’t take the test or didn’t score high enough to get academic credit, what does that mean?

  •  You may take Psych 111 or Psych 110.

 3)  Wait, why is AP/IB credit equivalenced to Psych 111:  Intro to Psych II?  Shouldn’t it be Psych 110:  Intro to Psych I?  After all this is the first college level psychology course I have had, so shouldn’t it be Intro I?

  • Decisions about course equivalence are based on the content, the material covered in the class.  From looking at the required curriculum for AP/IB Psychology classes and the test questions themselves from the AP/IB tests, it is clear that the course content matches up to Psych 111, not Psych 110.

 4)  I did a college summer program before I came to Emory and took a one semester Introduction to Psychology course there.  What do you do with these classes?

  • A one semester introductory course is given the equivalence of Psych 111.  This means that you should have earned some credit for History, Society, Cultures GER (HSC), may not take Psych 111 and may enroll in Psych 110.

 5) What is the difference between Psych 110 and Psych 111?

  • Psych 110 is the more neuroscience oriented component of the introductory sequence.  It covers the organization and operation of the nervous system as it pertains to behavior and its cognitive underpinnings. Psych 111 is the more social science oriented component of the introductory sequence. It covers research design, social psychology, social and emotional development, personality measurement and theory, psychopathology, and therapeutic interventions.
  • Students may take either Psych 110 or Psych 111 as their first course in psychology.

6) Does the Psychology Department offer any Freshman seminars?

  • Yes, we are offering three seminars for freshmen in the fall 2016 semester.  The topics of these seminars are Canine Cognition, Psychology of Fiction and The Nature of Evidence.  We will be offering other Freshman seminars in the spring with different topics.

 7)  Well, I think that I would like to take a psychology class.  What courses are best for freshmen?

  • Freshman seminars are always a good choice.  Other good choices for freshmen, especially first semester freshmen, are either Psych 110 or Psych 111.  These are the introductory classes and will give you a broad overview of a portion of the discipline of psychology.  Often, completion of one of these courses, or its equivalent, is a pre-requisite for taking higher level classes.  You may either take Psych 110 or Psych 111 first; one is not a requirement for the other. 

 8)  Supposed I decide that I might want to be a psychology major.  Where can I get information about the requirements of the major and anything I might need to know about the major?

  • Initially, the best place to get information about the psychology major at Emory is from the departmental homepage (www.psychology.emory.edu).  Almost everything you might need to know about the major is on the website and you can find the answers to lots of your questions.  If you have a specific question not answered on the website, you may ask your favorite psychology professor or contact the department.  Lorenza Houser, (lhouser@emory.edu), the undergraduate academic degree program coordinator, is a good resource.  You may also contact Dr. Barbara D. Strock (bstrock@emory.edu), the Director of Undergraduate Studies, with questions.

 9)  I want to declare a major right now, before I have even started classes.  Is this a good idea?

  • You might be advised to wait a bit longer to declare your major.  You have selected an undergraduate liberal arts institution which offers a lot of choices in terms of majors.  Since the heart of the liberal arts undergraduate experience is to broaden intellectual horizons, it is not uncommon for students to change majors a number of times during the college years and to graduate with majors in areas they didn't even know existed when they were in high school.  The key to a successful undergraduate experience is to keep an open mind about academic disciplines and to sample from as many related fields as possible before selecting a major.  Premature determination of the major and career goals will limit the possibilities for meaningful exploration in these areas.  Psychology is concerned with behavior; a number of other disciplines, such as political science, sociology, neuroscience and behavioral biology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and religion, are also concerned with behavior, but from a different perspective. So it would be a good idea to take classes in some of these areas as well as psychology before making a decision about a major.  You will be happiest and get the most out of your undergraduate education if you are patient enough to be certain that you are making an informed choice about your academic major.

 As an entering freshman, you are poised on the brink of a wonderful experience.  Emory has much to offer you and you have much to gain through your involvement in our community.  Good luck! 

Transfer Students

Department of Psychology: Frequently Ask Question for Transfer Students 

Welcome to Emory, your academic home for the next several years!  These next years will offer you the opportunity to expand your intellectual horizons and focus on an academic area.  You might be planning to major in psychology or you might simply be interested in taking a psychology course to learn more about this fascinating discipline.  Transfer students frequently have a number of general questions about psychology courses and the psychology major.

 1)  I took a number of psychology courses at my previous college.  Can they count toward my psychology major at Emory?

  •  The short answer is that it is possible for courses taken at other institutions to count toward the psych major.  For information on how to make this happen, look at the answer to # 5 to learn how to receive departmental approval for such courses.

 2)  I took the AP or IB test and Emory College has given me academic credit. What does that mean?

  •  You have received credit for the material presented in Psych 111:  Intro to Psychology II.  You have also earned some credit for the History, Society, Cultures GER (HSC).  It means that you may NOT take Psych 111 on the Emory campus;  that would be 6 hours of academic credit for 3 hours of work.  Emory frowns on this.  You may take Psych 110:  Introduction to Psychology I.  If you took the AP/IB class and either didn’t take the test or didn’t score high enough to get academic credit, then you may take Psych 111 or Psych 110.  AP/IB credit is equivalenced to Psych 111 based on content, the material covered in the class and on the test.

 3)  I took a one semester Introduction to Psychology course while at my previous college and received academic credit.  What happens with this class?

  •  A one semester introductory course is given the equivalence of Psych 111.  This means that you should have earned some credit for History, Society, Cultures GER (HSC), may not take Psych 111 and may enroll in Psych 110.  However, if your previous school had a 2 semester introductory sequence and you took the natural science component, it is possible you may receive credit for Psych 110 instead of Psych 111.  This is only possible for programs with a 2 semester introductory sequence. 

 4)  What is the difference between Psych 110 and Psych 111?

  •  Psych 110 is the more neuroscience oriented component of the introductory sequence..  It covers the organization and operation of the nervous system as it pertains to behavior and its cognitive underpinnings.
  • Psych 111 is the more social science oriented component of the introductory sequence. It covers research design, social psychology, social and emotional development, personality measurement and theory, psychopathology, and therapeutic interventions.

Students may take either Psych 110 or Psych 111 as their first course in psychology.

Both Psych 110 and Psych 111 are required for the psychology major.

 5)  How do I go about getting psych classes from my previous school approved for the major at Emory?

  • The first hurdle is College approval for your course.  If the College approves your course, it will be listed on your OPUS transcript and on the Emory Evaluation of Credit you received from the Office of Admission.  If the College does not approve the course, it cannot count toward the major.  Once the College has accepted your course, then you need to submit information about the course to the department.  You need to have a syllabus, not the course description, from when you took your course.  Courses cannot be considered without a syllabus.  We are interested in the content of the course and course requirements, not just the name of the course.  For each psych class you wish to have considered for the major, complete this form, Request to Transfer Completed Course Work Toward Emory Degree in Psychology, and return it to Lorenza Houser in the psychology main office, room 270 in PAIS.  The department’s Curriculum Committee will look over your submitted paperwork and make a determination about if and how the course may be applied to the major.  You will be contacted by e-mail with the committee’s decision.  It is best to complete this process as early as possible in your first semester on campus.

 7)  I would like to take a psychology class, but don’t want to major in psychology.  What courses would be best for me?

  •  A good place to begin would be with either Psych 110 or Psych 111.  These are the introductory classes and will give you a broad overview of a portion of the discipline of psychology.  Often, completion of one of these courses, or its equivalent, is a pre-requisite for taking higher level classes.  You may then enroll in classes that are interesting to you. 

 8)  I might want to be a psychology major.  Where can I get information about the requirements of the major and anything I might need to know about the major?

  •  Initially, the best place to get information about the psychology major at Emory is from the departmental homepage (www.psychology.emory.edu).  Almost everything you might need to know about the major is on the website and you can find the answers to lots of your questions.  If you have a specific question not answered on the website, you may ask your favorite psychology professor or contact the department.  Lorenza Houser, (lhouser@emory.edu), the academic degree program coordinator in the psychology main office, room 270 in PAIS, is a good resource.  You may also contact Dr. Barbara D. Strock (bstrock@emory.edu), the Director of Undergraduate Studies, with questions.

 9)  I haven’t taken any psychology classes previously, but I want to declare a psychology major right now.  Is this a good idea?

  •  You might be advised to wait a bit longer to make a decision about your major. The key to a successful undergraduate experience is to keep an open mind about academic disciplines and to sample from as many related fields as possible before selecting a major.  Premature determination of the major and career goals will limit the possibilities for meaningful exploration in these areas.  Psychology is concerned with behavior;  a number of other disciplines, such as political science, sociology, neuroscience and behavioral biology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and religion, are also concerned with behavior, but from a different perspective. So it would be a good idea to take classes in some of these areas as well as psychology before making a decision about a major.  You will be happiest and get the most out of your undergraduate education if you are patient enough to be certain that you are making an informed choice about your academic major.

As an entering Emory student, you are poised on the brink of a wonderful experience.  Emory has much to offer you and you have much to gain through your involvement in our community.  Good luck! 

Oxford Continuees

Frequently Asked Questions About the Psychology Major from Oxford Continuees

1. Do the psychology courses I took at Oxford College count toward the Psychology major at Emory College?

Yes, the majority of the Psychology courses you took at Oxford can be counted toward the 12 courses you need to complete for the Psychology major.  The exceptions are Psych 397R (Directed Study), other applied courses (course numbers may vary) and Special Topics courses for less than 3 credit hours.

2. Emory College has a 2 semester Intro sequence for Psychology.  How do my introductory courses from Oxford map onto this sequence? 

Successful completion of Psych 100 at Oxford fulfills the Psych 111 portion of the Intro sequence.  If you have successfully completed Psych 100 at Oxford, you may not take Psych 111. 
Successful completion of Psych 110 at Oxford fulfills the Psych 110 portion of the Intro sequence.  If you have successfully completed Psych 110 at Oxford, you may not take Psych 110.

3. I  took the Advanced Placement test in high school and received college credit.  How do I complete the Intro sequence?

 Earning a 4 or a 5 on the AP Psychology test exempts you from having to take Psych 100 at Oxford or Psych 111; it does not give you credit for Psych 111.  What this means is that you will still need to take 12 college courses in Psychology, you simply don’t have to take the portion of the introductory sequence that you covered in your high school class.  You will need to replace Psych 111 with an additional elective of your choice.  You may not take Psych 111.

4. I took Math 117: Introduction to Probability and Statistics at Oxford.  Are the contents of QTM 100: Introduction to Statistical Inference different from Math 117?

Yes, they are different.  Even if you have completed Math 107 you will still need to take QTM 100 for the Psychology major.  Taking Math 117 does not exempt you from this requirement.  Math 117 is a theoretical math course that discusses statistical concepts from a math perspective.  QTM 100 is an applied course which takes those math concepts and shows you how to apply them to the types of behavioral data psychologists work with.  In addition, you will also learn to use statistical analysis packages on the computer. 

5. How do I fulfill the research methodology requirements: QTM 100: Introduction to Statistical Inference and Psych 200: Research Methods?

If you successfully completed QTM 100 and Psych 200 at Oxford, you have fulfilled the research methodology requirement.  If you successfully completed QTM 100 but not Psyc 200, you will need to successfully complete Psyc 200. If you successfully completed Psyc 200 but not QTM 100, you will need to successfully complete QTM 100.

6. Some of the courses I took at Oxford look like they should fulfill one of the three breadth requirements for the Psychology major.  Can my Oxford courses be used to fulfill the breadth requirements?

 Yes, courses taken at Oxford may be used to fulfill the breadth requirements.  Courses you may have taken at Oxford which fulfill breadth requirements include:

      Social/Personality/Applied Area
                  Psych 210 – Adult Abnormal
                  Psych 330 – Personality Theories

      Neuroscience and Animal Behavior Area
                  Psych 207 – Brain and Behavior 
     
     Cognition and Development Area
                 Psych 205 – Child Development
 

Other courses you took at Oxford can fulfill the elective portion of the major requirements.  Such courses might include Psych 208 (Psychology of Gender), Psych 221 (Human Sexuality) and 3 hour Special Topics courses. One enrollment in Psyc 499R or Psyc 494R (Study Abroad) for 3 or more credit hours may be counted as an elective only if you are a 12 course major.

Possible Jobs with BA in Psychology

WHAT KINDS OF JOBS CAN I DO WITH A BA IN PSYCHOLOGY?
  • Advertising Art Psychologist / Art Therapist
  • Behavior psychotherapist / Behavioral therapist
  • Business Manager
  • Career counselor
  • Child Development specialist
  • Clinical coordinator / Clinical director
  • Clinician
  • Community and social services worker
  • Community services specialist
  • Consultant
  • Customer service representative
  • Dance therapist
  • Expressive therapist
  • Health Professional
  • House manager / House parent
  • Human resources professional
  • Laboratory technician (sleep lab)
  • Marriage therapist
  • Massage therapist
  • Mental health worker
  • Mental retardation counselor  
  • Negotiator                                  
    
  • Occupational therapist
  • Parent Counselor / Parent educator
  • Physical therapist
  • Policy analyst
  • Prevention counselor
  • Psychological rehabilitation counselor                  
  • Psychologist
  • Researcher
  • Residential clinical director
  • Safety coordinator
  • Salesperson
  • Social worker
  • Special school counselor
  • Substance abuse counselor
  • Therapist
  • Trainer / Training specialist
  • Training and developmental manager
  • Women’s counselor
  • Writer
  • Youth service worker  
Source: Great Jobs for Psychology Majors (Julie Degalan & Stephan Lambert)
Note:  Some positions require secondary training.