Courses

Please Note: The information given in the Course Atlas is subject to change.

For final schedule information, please refer to OPUS or the professor of the course.

PSYCHOLOGY 546: Intervention I: Theories of Psychotherapy
Craighead, Wed 10:00-12:30, PAIS 393

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Introduction to the theory and practice of individual psychotherapy including psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Examples of applications to both childhood and adult problems are included in this course

Particulars: Enrollment is open to graduate students and Emory College senior honors students.


PSYCHOLOGY 549: Assessment II: Personality & Psychopathology
Lilienfeld, Tues 9:00-11:30, PAIS 494

Maximum Enrollment: 8. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This course will cover both theoretical and applied issues in personality assessment. Special emphasis will be placed on clinical judgment and prediction, the research literature on personality assessment and on structured personality tests (particularly the MMPI-2) and structured psychiatric interviews, as well as on both the strengths and limitations of clinical judgment and prediction.

Texts: Graham, J.R. (2012). MMPI-2: Assessing Personality and Psychopathology (3rd ed.) NY: Oxford University Press. Shea, S. (1998). Psychiatric Interviewing: The Art of Understanding Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company.

Particulars: One midterm and a final exam; periodic homework assignments.


PSYCHOLOGY 552: Animal Behavior and Evolution
Gouzoules &  Maney,  Tues Thurs 2:30-3:45, PAIS 493

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This is a lecture course on the study of animal behavior from both topical and historical perspectives and emphasizes naturalistic behavior and approaches. We will approach all of the material from an evolutionary, functional perspective, beginning with early ethology and moving through behavioral genetics, endocrinology, and neuroethology. The majority of the course focuses on the evolution of behavioral strategies, such as courtship and mating systems, cooperation, aggression, parenting, and communication, with some discussion of social cognition and culture. The relevance of sociobiological research to humans will be discussed.


PSYCHOLOGY 561: Multiple Regressions and the General Linear Model
Waldman, Tues 1:00 - 4:00, PAIS 361

Maximum Enrollment: 12. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: In this course we will examine multiple regression analysis and the general linear model as a comprehensive statistical analytical framework, including a mix of theoretical, conceptual and "hands-on" approaches. We will begin with basic statistical concepts and their assumptions and then explore some useful graphical statistical methods, the relation of regression to ANOVA, model adequacy and regression diagnostics, and models containing additive, interactive, curvilinear, and indirect effects. Time permitting, we will also examine analyses of categorical and of multiple dependent variables.

Texts: Selected articles and chapters, and text(s) TBA. 
Particulars: By consent of instructor only. There will be four or five assignments integrating statistical analyses on computer with concepts learned in class, as well as two exams to test students' knowledge of the material covered.

Prerequisite: Advanced Statistics (PSYC 560).


PSYCHOLOGY 597R: Directed Study
By Faculty
TBA

Particulars: Graduate students only. (Permission required prior to enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 599R: Master Thesis Research
By Faculty TBA

Particulars: Graduate students only. (Permission required prior to enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 614: Memory
Bauer & Hamann,  Tues 1:00-3:30, PAIS TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Particulars: This course runs on the 1st seven weeks of the semester only, 2 credits.


PSYCHOLOGY 720: Behavioral Effects of Drugs
Neill & Palmer,  TBA

Maximum Enrollment:
 20.  (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This graduate/advanced undergraduate course will be an adventure combining lecture and seminar formats of teaching. You are all advanced students who have exhibited an interest in tackling some challenging, but very fascinating material on addiction. Our challenge over the next couple of weeks is to work together to make this a terrific learning experience for all. That said, this will not be your typical lecture sequence. We (Drs. Palmer and Neill) will not always be standing in front of the class, having chosen, culled and organized material that will be available to you. Although we have pre-selected the material you will be reading, we will also be also reading it with you while proving guidance about how to read the material. You will have the opportunity to suggest ideas or interpretations of the readings or bring in ideas from the articles listed.

 Particulars: Course readings will focus on three major themes: The Pharmacology of Drug Action → Determinants of Substance Use Disorders → Psychopathology, Drugs, & Comorbidity.

 At the end of this course you will be able to:

  1. Describe the neurobiological mechanisms of reward and how it pertains to substance abuse;
  2. Describe the various causes of behavior, particularly addiction (psychosocial & biological)
  3. Describe the addictive process and its generalizability to various drugs (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, cocaine/crack, heroin, and other substances);
  4. Clinically define addiction
  5. Identify behavioral correlates describe and critique the models of primary prevention, treatment, and relapse prevention;

PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Event Related Potentials (ERPs)
Bauer, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Proseminar in Learning
Bauer & Manns,  Mon 1:00-2:15, PAIS 393

Maximum Enrollment: 12. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Culture and Cognition
Dilks, Lourenco & Rochat;  Fri 1:00-2:15, PAIS 493

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Research, reading, and discussion group on cognition and social cognition from a cross-cultural and comparative perspective.

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group
Maney & Wallen, Tues 4:00-5:15, PAIS 493

Maximum Enrollment: 10 (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This seminar will focus on discussion of primary literature and student presentations in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology.

Texts: Selected readings from scientific journals may be assigned for individual sessions.

Particulars: NAB graduate students interested in behavioral endocrinology and neuroendocrinology are especially encouraged to enroll. Graduate students from other programs are welcome as well. Content will vary from semester to semester and the course can be repeated for credit. Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 750R: Clinical Practicum/Supervision: Assessment
Abramowitz, Emory, McDowell, Messina, Snow & Wyner;   TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 5. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Supervised clinical work in assessment and treatment of clients.


PSYCHOLOGY 750R: Clinical Practicum/Supervision: Therapy
Abramowitz, Duke, McDowell, Messina, Snow, Walker &  Wyner;   TBA

Maximum Enrollment: TBA. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Supervised clinical work in therapy and treatment of clients. 


PSYCHOLOGY 750L: Clinical Practicum: Assessment I: Part I Lab
Abramowitz, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 5. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Particulars: Must be a graduate student enrolled in Psyc 549.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Clinical Practicum/Supervision: Practicum in Evidence-Based Treatment for Children
Abramowitz, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: TBA.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Messina, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10. (Permission required prior to enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Walker, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10. (Permission required prior to enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 760: Teaching Practicum: Pedadogy
Bauer, Wed 1:30-4:00, PAIS 280

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This course focuses on strategies for teaching undergraduate courses in psychology. Topics include setting teaching goals and objectives, preparing a syllabus, choosing required reading, preparing lectures, exams and grading, leading class discussions, active learning strategies, the use of new teaching technologies on the internet and in the classroom, and legal and ethical issues. Current literature on teaching effectiveness is reviewed. Several in-class exercises and outside projects provide students opportunities to develop their teaching abilities.

Particulars:This course is required for graduate students assigned as teaching assistants for PSYC 200WR and QTM 100 during the academic year.


PSYCHOLOGY 770N: Behavior Therapy
McDowell, Thurs 1:00-3:30, PAIS TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 20. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: The topic of this course is the application of basic behavior-analytic research to the clinical problems of children and adults.  It will consist of lectures on basic behavior-analysis and general methods of behavior therapy, and student presentations on selected clinical topics.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Advanced Imaging Practicum
Berns, Tues 5:00-7:30, PAIS 393

Maximum Enrollment: 4. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Prior coursework in neuroimaging, especially fMRI, and consent of instructor. This practicum will assume you already know the basics of how fMRI works, how to design a behavioral experiment, and how to do univariate statistics. Because you will be working in the FERN MRI environment, you will also need to have completed safety training. Details and SOPs can be found on the website at www.fern.emory.edu.

Particulars:  This course will provide a comprehensive and practical introduction to the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Students will learn and apply the basic physics underlying MRI, the biological principles of fMRI, the principles of experimental design, the processing steps associated with data analysis, and the use of available software packages. Each week’s session will be composed of a lecture and laboratory. Where possible, the laboratory topics will be flexible so that students with more experience can explore the issues covered in more detail. Students will design and conduct their own fMRI study.

Come prepared to each class. The strength of the class depends on everyone coming prepared and actively participating. You may work either individually or in pairs. The graded requirements will be based on completion of five modules:
1. Definition of the cognitive task.
2. Task design.
3. Task implementation.
4. Data collection.
5. Analysis.

Grading: If you complete all the modules, you pass!

Textbook: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 3rd Edition by Huettel, Song, and McCarthy, Sinauer Publishing, 2014. 

IRB: You will be collecting data in human subjects. If you want to use these data in a paper or grant application, you must have IRB approval before studying any subjects.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Developmental Psychopathology
Goodman, Wed 1:00 - 3:30, PAIS 493

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment) 

Content:   The primary goal of this course is for students to begin to answer one primary question: How can knowledge of normal development inform our efforts to elucidate the etiology of disorders, to assess and classify child psychopathology, and to develop effective treatments for childhood disorders?  We will also be concerned with issues regarding the continuity or discontinuity of disorders from childhood to adulthood.

In this seminar, students consider the relationships between the fields of developmental psychology (the study of normal social, emotional, cognitive development, etc.) and clinical psychology (the studies of psychopathology and behavior change).  Developmental psychopathology is a relatively new field and is still emerging.  It represents the contributions of principles of normal development to the understanding of the origins and course of individual patterns of adaptation and maladaptation and behavior change. 

Graduate students of all aspects of psychology will benefit from this course. Training to become a clinical psychologist will be enhanced by the opportunity to integrate relevant knowledge in cognitive, behavioral, affective, social and biological development, and family relations into issues of clinical concern.  Conversely, developmental psychology and neuroscience and animal behavior students will have the opportunity to explore how information on developmental deviances can contribute to understandings of both normal development and psychopathology.  Thus students will learn about the normal and abnormal development of specific phenomena (e.g. developmental delays, immature rates of development, the range of individual differences in development of abilities, patterns of adaptation and maladaptation).  The seminar will provide theoretical perspectives as well as exposure to relevant research and consideration of clinical issues.  A major emphasis will be on studies of risk, competence, and protective factors as basic concepts for the study of developmental psychopathology.  I will encourage students to consider the advantages of a perspective that integrates not only developmental and abnormal psychology, but also biological (including genetics, neuropsychology, and neuroendocrinology) and cognitive perspectives.  Students will be encouraged to think creatively about the opportunities provided by the developmental psychopathology perspective and the potential research and clinical contributions that may evolve from it.

Particulars: This course is intended for but not limited to graduate students in clinical, cognition and development, and neuroscience and animal behavior, with enrollment priority given to students in clinical.  Undergraduate students may also take this course if they have completed all of the following: Adult Abnormal Psychology, Child Psychopathology, Child Development, Lab Methods, and Statistics.  Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Diversity
Emory, Mon 12:00-2:30, PAIS 493

Maximum Enrollment: 15.(Permission required prior to enrollment)

Particulars: TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Item Response Theory
Cheong, Tues 9:00-11:30, PAIS 361

Maximum Enrollment: 12. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: We will study item response theory (IRT) as an approach to the construction, analysis, and scoring of psychological measures in this course.  We will start with an overview of IRT and its historical development, followed by a comparison of the principles of IRT and the classical test theory. Then we will study different IRT models for binary and polytomous data and how they are applied in cognitive, developmental, personality, and attitude assessment.   The focus of this course is on the conceptual and practical understanding of IRT.  We will use various IRT R packages such as ltm, eRm, and lme4 for computing.  No previous experience in R is required. 

Particulars: This class is heavily based on class discussion.  There will be five to six homework assignments that involve conceptual questions, data analysis, and article reviews. In addition, students will identify or collect a measurement data set and apply IRT to study their quality and write up the results in a report for the class.

Pre-requisite: A course on multiple regression.

Textbook: Embretson, S. E. & Reise, S. P. (2000). Item response theory for psychologists. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers


PSYCHOLOGY 774R: Clinical Research & Training Seminar
Craighead, 
Wed 9:00-10:30, PAIS 280

Maximum Enrollment: None. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This is the ongoing research and training seminar of the clinical psychology graduate program. Topics vary from year to year, but include research presentations by students and faculty and theoretical and research-based discussions of clinical issues. Special topics such as ethics, legal questions, social issues, and problems of special populations are also addressed.

Texts: There are no texts, but reading may be assigned in preparation for individual presentations.

Particulars: This course is required for all clinical psychology graduate students during each of their first four years in residence. The course is intended for but not limited to students outside of the department of psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 775R: Neuroscience & Animal Behavior Research Seminar
Gouzoules, Thurs 4:00 –5:30, PAIS 280

Maximum Enrollment: None. (Permission required prior to enrollment) 

Content: This seminar serves primarily as a way for graduate students and faculty interested in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior to share their research and ideas. Content varies from semester to semester. The course includes presentations by NAB students and faculty as well as occasional visitors from other departments and universities. Issues in ethics will also be covered.

Particulars: All graduate students registered for the seminar are expected to present a talk or lead a discussion at least once during the academic year. All student presenters receive detailed feedback on their presentation.


PSYCHOLOGY 776R: Cognition and Developmental Issues Seminar 
Lourenco, Wed 12:00-1:00, PAIS 280

Maximum Enrollment: None. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This course focuses on current findings and theoretical issues in the study of cognition and development.


PSYCHOLOGY 797R: Directed Study 
By Faculty, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: None (Permission required for enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 799R:Doctoral Dissertation Research
By Faculty, TBA

Maximum Enrollment: None (Permission required for enrollment)

PSYCHOLOGY 541: Personality and Psychopathology 
Westen
Mon 9:00-11:30

Maximum Enrollment: 10. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: The focus is on the nature and classification of psychopathology, with a focus on the relation between personality and psychopathology. The course begins with a discussion of theoretical perspectives on psychopathology, followed by a review of the latest research on the major forms of psychiatric disturbance described in the DSM-IV.

Texts: Reading materials will be original sources, consisting of classic and recent articles from the psychopathology literature.

Particulars: One exam paper.


PSYCHOLOGY 548: Assessment I
Abramowitz
Thurs 12:00-2:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: The goal of this course, along with its associated practicum, is to provide a foundation in psychometric theory, a foundation in theories and research relating to intelligence and its measurement, an understanding of the legitimate and ethical purposes of assessment, training and supervision in key assessment instruments, and training in assessment as an integrative process. Assessment of learning problems, from preschool to adult, will be covered.


PSYCHOLOGY 552: Animal Behavior and Evolution
Gouzoules
Maney
Tues Thurs 11:30-12:45

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This is a lecture course on the study of animal behavior from both topical and historical perspectives and emphasizes naturalistic behavior and approaches. We will approach all of the material from an evolutionary, functional perspective, beginning with early ethology and moving through behavioral genetics, endocrinology, and neuroethology. The majority of the course focuses on the evolution of behavioral strategies, such as courtship and mating systems, cooperation, aggression, parenting, and communication, with some discussion of social cognition and culture. The relevance of sociobiological research to humans will be discussed.


PSYCHOLOGY 560: ANOVA – Advanced Statistics
McDowell 
Tues Thurs 10:00 – 11:15

Maximum Enrollment: 16. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Provides students with appropriate statistical tools to analyze the data obtained in traditional psychological research involving the manipulations of one or more independent variables. The emphasis is on the Analysis of Variance, which forms the backbone of much of psychological research. Topics include when and how to perform the analysis of variance for one-way designs, for factorial design, and for a variety of repeated measure designs. A second major objective of the course is to learn how to analyze data using SPSS, one of the frequently used computer-based data analysis packages.


PSYCHOLOGY 597R: Directed Study
By Faculty
TBA 


PSYCHOLOGY 599R: Master Thesis Research
By Faculty
TBA 


PSYCHOLOGY 611: Cognitive Theory and Methods
Dilks
Lourenco
Wed 2:30-5:00

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

This course is one of several modules within the Cognition and Development (C & D) graduate program. Each module lasts 7 weeks (i.e., half a semester) and students receive 2 credits upon successful completion. The teaching aim of these modules is to provide students with a solid conceptual foundation to make sense of classic and current issues within the literatures of cognition and development. Graduate students from other Psychology programs, other Emory departments, and other Atlanta universities are also welcome. Undergraduate honors students at Emory may also be admitted with instructor approval. In particular, this course addresses cognitive theory and methods. The goal is to cover classic and current theoretical perspectives as well as methodological approaches in human cognition.

Course Particular: This 7 weekly three-hour class will have at least three components: 1) Faculty lectures introducing the particular topic with the goal of providing students with historical background and current perspectives, 2) Discussion between faculty and students on assigned (classic and current) readings, 3) Separate student discussion of weekly lecture and readings. 

Textbook: No textbook, rather students will read articles that will be posted on blackboard. 


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: The Language Group
Nygaard
Mon 10:00 - 11:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This is a research seminar in which students, faculty, and post-docs discuss their work and recent papers on topics related to language including speech processing, symbolic representation, word learning, non-verbal communication, and categorization from behavioral and neuroscientific, adult and developmental perspectives.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Narrative Identity
Fivush
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: TBA. Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Proseminar in Learning
Bauer
Manns
Mon 1:00-2:15

Maximum Enrollment: 12. (Permission required prior to enrollment)
Content: TBA

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Big Data and the Mind
Wolff
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: TBA. Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group
Wallen
Tues 4:00-5:30

Maximum Enrollment: 10 (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: This seminar will focus on discussion of primary literature and student presentations in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology.

Texts: Selected readings from scientific journals may be assigned for individual sessions.

Particulars: NAB graduate students interested in behavioral endocrinology and neuroendocrinology are especially encouraged to enroll.  Graduate students from other programs are welcome as well. Content will vary from semester to semester and the course can be repeated for credit.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Culture and Cognition
Dilks
Lourenco
Hamann
Fri 1:00-2:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Research, reading (the most current, as well as seminar papers), and discussion on group on perception, cognition, and social cognition from infancy to adulthood, examining behavioral, neuroscientific, and cross-cultural data.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Clinical Supervision: Assessment Practicum
Abramowitz
Duke 
Messina 
Snow
Wyner

Maximum Enrollment: 5. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Supervised clinical work in psychological assessment.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Clinical Supervision: Therapy Practicum
Abramowitz 
Duke
Messina
Snow
Wyner


Maximum Enrollment: 
5. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: Supervised clinical work in psychological therapy.

 


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Messina
Walker
Emory

Particulars: (Permission required prior to enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 750L: Assessment Practicum I
Abramowitz
TBA

Particulars: (Permission required prior to enrollment)


PSYCHOLOGY 770N: Behavior Therapy
McDowell
Thurs 1:00-3:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: The topic of this course is the application of basic behavior-analytic research to the clinical problems of children and adults.  It will consist of lectures on basic behavior-analysis and general methods of behavior therapy, and student presentations on selected clinical topics.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Animal Models of Developmental Psychopathology
Bachevalier
Tues Thurs 2:30-3:45

Maximum Enrollment: 12. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Content: TBA.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Neurobiology and Applications of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms
Rodman
Friday 9:30-12:00

Maximum Enrollment: 16 (Permission not required for grad students; permission required for undergraduates).

Description: This is a seminar course which will approach the biological basis of sleep and sleep timing in a multidisciplinary fashion suitable for graduate students in psychology and related disciplines. Data from the primary literature will be considered in light of their potential for application to both research and clinical domains. Material addressed will include neural and hormonal mechanisms, animal models, evolutionary considerations, implications of normal patterns and perturbations of sleep and circadian function, and cross-cultural findings. Format will be primarily discussion and student presentation of original research literature, augmented by some lecture material as needed. Students will also have opportunities to keep and reflect on a sleep log, to explore practical approaches to measuring sleep with wearable technology, and to examine brain tissue to build a three-dimensional understanding of the neural networks governing sleep and circadian rhythms across species. 


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Latent Variable Models
Waldman
Tuesday 2:00-4:30

Maximum Enrollment: 12. (Permission required prior to enrollment)

Description: TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: William James Seminar: Psychological Principles, Religious Experience, and Pragmatism (Same as RLPC 710K and EDS 771V)
Snarey
Tues 2:30-5:00

Maximum Enrollment: 5

William James (1842-1910), a giant in American intellectual history, is variously considered to be the founding father of American psychology, the foremost and most American philosopher, and a pioneer in the psychological study of religion in America.  This course embraces all three faces of James.  The seminar begins with a psychological biography; then seminar members will become familiar first-hand with James’s psychology by studying selected chapters from his classic volumes, Psychology: The Briefer Course (1892) and Talks to Teachers on Psychology (1899).  Similar attention will be given to James’s philosophical pragmatism by reading essays from his classic volumes, especially Pragmatism (1907) and A Pluralistic Universe (1909).  Building on this biographical-psychological-philosophical foundation, the primary section of the seminar involves a close reading of James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902), which is often regarded as the greatest classic in the psychological study of religion. Critiques of James will be introduced throughout the course, but we will conclude the semester with an overview of critical essays written by James’s detractors and assess what we may have missed, and what they may have missed.


PSYCHOLOGY 774R: Clinical Research & Training Seminar
Craighead

Wed 9:00-10:30

Content: This is the ongoing research and training seminar of the clinical psychology graduate program. Topics vary from year to year, but include research presentations by students and faculty and theoretical and research-based discussions of clinical issues. Special topics such as ethics, legal questions, social issues, and problems of special populations are also addressed.

Texts: There are no texts, but reading may be assigned in preparation for individual presentations.

Particulars: This course is required for all clinical psychology graduate students during each of their first four years in residence. The course is not open to students outside of the department of psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 775R: Neuroscience & Animal Behavior Research Seminar  
Hampton
Thurs 4:00 –5:30

Content: This seminar serves primarily as a way for graduate students and faculty interested in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior to share their research and ideas. Content varies from semester to semester. The course includes presentations by NAB students and faculty as well as occasional visitors from other departments and universities. Issues in ethics will also be covered.

Particulars: All graduate students registered for the seminar are expected to present a talk or lead a discussion at least once during the academic year. All student presenters receive detailed feedback on their presentation. 


PSYCHOLOGY 776R: Cognition and Developmental Issues Seminar 
Lourenco
Wed 12:00-1:00

Content: This course focuses on current findings and theoretical issues in the study of cognition and development. 


PSYCHOLOGY 797R: Directed Study 
By Faculty
TBA  


PSYCHOLOGY 799R:Doctoral Dissertation Research
By Faculty
TBA

PSYCHOLOGY 547: Intervention II
Goodman
Tues 9:00-11:30

Maximum Enrollment: 12

Goals.  The goals of the course are to develop critical thinking, knowledge, and skills in the following areas of study:
1. Healthy family development and processes, including their cultural variations.  This is the developmental framework needed for an understanding of the other two goals.
2. Family processes that are associated with the development or maintenance of psychopathology in children or adolescents;
3. Design, evaluation, and implementation of evidence based methods of assessment and intervention for families with a child who has psychopathology.


PSYCHOLOGY 549: Assessment II: Personality & Psychopathology
Lilienfeld
Tues 9:00-11:30

Maximum Enrollment: 8

Content: This course will cover both theoretical and applied issues in personality assessment. Special emphasis will be placed on clinical judgment and prediction, the research literature on personality assessment and on structured personality tests (particularly the MMPI-2) and structured psychiatric interviews, as well as on both the strengths and limitations of clinical judgment and prediction.

Texts: Graham, J.R. (2012). MMPI-2: Assessing Personality and Psychopathology (3rd ed.) NY: Oxford University Press. Shea, S. (1998). Psychiatric Interviewing: The Art of Understanding Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company.

Particulars: One midterm and a final exam; periodic homework assignments.


PSYCHOLOGY 551: Neurobiology of Cognition and Motivated Behavior
Edwards
Neill
Wallen

Tues Thurs 10:00-11:15

Maximum Enrollment:
15

Content: This course is part of a core series of course required of graduate students in the Psychology Department's Neuroscience and Animal Behavior Doctoral Program. We welcome students from outside (NAB/Psychology), and the course can be taken out of sequence or without taking the other course in the series. Topics this year include sexual differentiation, the hormonal activation of social behavior, hormone actions on the brain and spinal cord, the neurobiology of thirst, the role of activation in motivated behavior, and a detailed treatment of how learning and memory are represented in the organization of the brain.



PSYCHOLOGY 561: Multiple Regressions and the General Linear Model
Waldman
Tues 1:00 - 4:00

Maximum Enrollment: 12

Content: In this course we will examine multiple regression analysis and the general linear model as a comprehensive statistical analytical framework, including a mix of theoretical, conceptual and "hands-on" approaches. We will begin with basic statistical concepts and their assumptions and then explore some useful graphical statistical methods, the relation of regression to ANOVA, model adequacy and regression diagnostics, and models containing additive, interactive, curvilinear, and indirect effects. Time permitting, we will also examine analyses of categorical and of multiple dependent variables.

Texts: Selected articles and chapters, and text(s) TBA. 

Particulars: By consent of instructor only. There will be four or five assignments integrating statistical analyses on computer with concepts learned in class, as well as two exams to test students' knowledge of the material covered.

Prerequisite: Advanced Statistics (PSYC 560).


PSYCHOLOGY 580: History of Psychology
Brennan
Duke

Wed 3:00-5:30

Maximum Enrollment: 18

Content: The history and theoretical systems of psychology as a natural science. Psychology, like other sciences, changes and develops over time. We will cover historical trends in Psychology, looking for controversies and themes that emerge repeatedly in the brief history of scientific psychology.  The emphasis will be on the respective specialties of the 3 instructors: clinical, comparative, and developmental psychology. By examining where psychology has been, why it changed, and where it is now, we hope to benefit from earlier insights that tend to be forgotten but can give us a better sense of the limits and progress of modern psychology

Particulars: Graduate students only.


PSYCHOLOGY 610: Developmental Theory & Methods
Lourenco
Rochat
Wed 9:00-12:00

Maximum Enrollment: 20 (By permission only)

Particulars: TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 616: Social Cognition and Emotion
Hamann
Rochat
Wed 9:00-12:00

Maximum Enrollment: 20 (By permission only)

Particulars: TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 597R: Directed Study
Faculty

TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 599R: Master Thesis Research
Faculty
TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Event Related Potentials (ERPs)
Bauer
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 15. By permission of the Instructor.

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Proseminar in Learning
Bauer
Mon 1:00-2:15

Maximum Enrollment: 12. By permission of the Instructor.

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Language and Thought
Fivush
Wolff
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10 (Permission of the Instructor is required)

Content: TBA

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: The Language Group
Nygaard
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 15 (Permission of the Instructor is required)

Content:This is a research seminar in which students, faculty, and post-docs discuss their work and recent papers on topics related to language including speech processing, symbolic representation, word learning, non-verbal communication, and categorization from behavioral and neuroscientific, adult and developmental perspectives.

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Culture and Cognition
Dilks
Lourenco
Rochat
Fri 1:00-2:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15. By permission of the Instructor only.

Content: Research, reading, and discussion group on cognition and social cognition from a cross-cultural and comparative perspective.

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group
Maney
Wallen
Tues 4:00-5:30

Maximum Enrollment: 10 (Permission of the Instructor is required)

Content: This seminar will focus on discussion of primary literature and student presentations in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology.

Texts: Selected readings from scientific journals may be assigned for individual sessions.

Particulars: NAB graduate students interested in behavioral endocrinology and neuroendocrinology are especially encouraged to enroll. Graduate students from other programs are welcome as well. Content will vary from semester to semester and the course can be repeated for credit. Pass/fail only.

Specifics: Open to all Psychology graduate students. Undergraduate and other students require permission from the Instructor prior to enrollment.


PSYCHOLOGY 750R: Clinical Practicum/Supervision: Assessment
Abramowitz
Emory
McDowell
Messina
Snow 
Wyner

TBA

Maximum Enrollment: TBA

Content: Supervised clinical work in assessment and treatment of clients.

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750R: Clinical Practicum/Supervision: Intervention
Abramowitz
Duke
McDowell
Messina
Snow
Walker
Wyner
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: TBA

Content: Supervised clinical work in assessment and treatment of clients.

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750L: Clinical Practicum: Assessment I: Part I Lab
Abramowitz
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 5

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology enrolled in Psyc 549.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Clinical Practicum/Supervision: Practicum in Evidence-Based Treatment for Children
Abramowitz
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10

Content: TBA.

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Messina
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Walker
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 760: Teaching Practicum: Pedadogy
Bauer
Thurs 1:00-3:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15

Content: This course focuses on strategies for teaching undergraduate courses in psychology. Topics include setting teaching goals and objectives, preparing a syllabus, choosing required reading, preparing lectures, exams and grading, leading class discussions, active learning strategies, the use of new teaching technologies on the internet and in the classroom, and legal and ethical issues. Current literature on teaching effectiveness is reviewed. Several in-class exercises and outside projects provide students opportunities to develop their teaching abilities.

Particulars:This course is required for graduate students assigned as teaching assistants for PSYC 200WR and QTM 100 during the academic year.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Advanced Imaging Practicum
Berns
Tues 5:00-7:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15 (Permission required for enrollment)

Content: TBA.

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Data Mining the Mind
Wolff
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 25. Permission is required prior to enrollment.

Particulars: Through the constant use of electronic resources and mobile devices, we are generating enormous amounts of data, which are now analyzable through a special class of computational techniques known as “big data.” Big data has already led to breakthroughs in science, including the unlocking of the human genome and discoveries in particle physics. With further investigation of big data, we may be able to gain a completely new perspective on our world, on how people feel about important issues, interact, and organize their time.

The goal of this class is to investigate how Big Data might impact the study of the mind and of social behavior.  To this end, the class will include three major components.

  • First, the class will provide tutorials in programing in Python. Understanding big data requires programming skills, and Python is arguably the best entry-level language to begin to undertake such analyses.
  • Second, the class will review prominent techniques in machining learning and data mining, including several types of dimensionality reduction (PCA, multi-dimensional scaling, t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding); various techniques in categorization and clustering (k-means, gmeans, SVM); techniques that can be applied to very large corpora (e.g., syntactic parsing, named entity recognition, and regular expression pattern matching); image analysis (e.g., handwriting recognition, object recognition); and various types of automated learning (word2vec, LDA, deep-learning).  Emphasis will be placed not only on gaining an intuitive understanding of these techniques but also on step-by-step tutorials on conducting these analyses.
  • Finally, the course will examine potential implications of Big Data for theory in cognitive science. As noted in a recent paper, “theory will always get blown away by data.” While the science of the mind can’t be reduced to technology, the emergence of Big Data may lead to theories that differ vastly from the ones that have framed research over the last century.


PSYCHOLOGY 774R
: Clinical Research & Teaching Seminar
Craighead
Wed 9:00-10:50

Maximum Enrollment: None

Content: This is the ongoing research and training seminar of the clinical psychology graduate program. Topics vary from year to year, but include research presentations by students and faculty and theoretical and research-based discussions of clinical issues. Special topics such as ethics, legal questions, social issues, and problems of special populations are also addressed.

Texts: There are no texts, but reading may be assigned in preparation for individual presentations.

Particulars: This course is required for all clinical psychology graduate students during each of their first four years in residence. The course is not open to students outside of the department of psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 775R: Neuroscience & Animal Behavior Research Seminar 
Hampton

Thurs 4:00 –5:30

Maximum Enrollment: None

Content: This seminars serves primarily as a way for graduate students and faculty interested in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior to share their research and ideas. Content varies from semester to semester. The course includes presentations by NAB students and faculty as well as occasional visitors from other departments and universities.

Particulars: All graduate students registered for the seminar are expected to present a talk or lead a discussion at least once during the academic year. All student presenters receive detailed feedback on their presentation.


PSYCHOLOGY 776R: Cognition and Developmental Issues Seminar 
Lourenco
Wed 12:00-1:00

Maximum Enrollment: None

Content: This course focuses on current findings and theoretical issues in the study of cognition and development.


PSYCHOLOGY 797R: Directed Study 
TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 799R:Doctoral Dissertation Research
TBA

PSYCHOLOGY 530: Primate Social Behavior
de Waal 
Gouzoules 
TTH 11:30-12:45

Maximum Enrollment: 16. Permission of the Instructor is required.

Particulars: This course examines the historical context for understanding the study of primate social organization and behavior and will introduce students to current research. Evolutionary, ecological and cognitive aspects of primate behavior are emphasized.


PSYCHOLOGY 541: Personality and Psychopathology 
Westen
Mon 9:30-12:00

Maximum Enrollment: 10. Permission of the Instructor is required.

Content: The focus is on the nature and classification of psychopathology, with a focus on the relation between personality and psychopathology. The course begins with a discussion of theoretical perspectives on psychopathology, followed by a review of the latest research on the major forms of psychiatric disturbance described in the DSM-IV.

Texts: Reading materials will be original sources, consisting of classic and recent articles from the psychopathology literature.

Particulars: One exam paper.


PSYCHOLOGY 542: Research Methods in Clinical Psychology 
Brennan
Wed 1:00-4:00

Maximum Enrollment: 8. Permission is required prior to enrollment

Content: This graduate course introduces a variety of research methods and designs used in the field of psychology. Students will interact with faculty from the clinical psychology program and have an opportunity to hear about their current research projects. Critical thinking, conceptualization, and writing skills will be emphasized.

Particulars:This course is open to first year clinical graduate students and others by permission of the instructor only. All students must register s/u only. Student's laptop use is not allowed in the classroom.


PSYCHOLOGY 548: Assessment I
Abramowitz
Thurs 12:00-3:00

Maximum Enrollment: 15. Permission is required prior to enrollment

Content: The goal of this course, along with its associated practicum, is to provide a foundation in psychometric theory, a foundation in theories and research relating to intelligence and its measurement, an understanding of the legitimate and ethical purposes of assessment, training and supervision in key assessment instruments, and training in assessment as an integrative process. Assessment of learning problems, from preschool to adult, will be covered.


PSYCHOLOGY 550:NAB Core Course I: Fundamentals of Systems Neuroscience
Bachevalier
Manns 
Rodman
Tues Thurs 1:00-2:15

Maximum Enrollment: 16. Permission is required prior to enrollment.

Content: This course is the first in a sequence of four core classes required of students in the Neuroscience and Animal Behavior graduate program. Topics to be covered include the workings of neurons, fundamentals of vertebrate brain organization and development, sensory systems, motor systems, neural processes of reward and addiction, and the neurobiology of emotion.


PSYCHOLOGY 560: ANOVA – Advanced Statistics 
McDowell 
Tues Thurs 10:00 – 11:15

Maximum Enrollment: 16. Permission is required prior to enrollment.

Content: Provides students with appropriate statistical tools to analyze the data obtained in traditional psychological research involving the manipulations of one or more independent variables. The emphasis is on the Analysis of Variance, which forms the backbone of much of psychological research. Topics include when and how to perform the analysis of variance for one-way designs, for factorial design, and for a variety of repeated measure designs. A second major objective of the course is to learn how to analyze data using SPSS, one of the frequently used computer-based data analysis packages.


PSYCHOLOGY 597R: Directed Study
By Faculty

TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 599R: Master Thesis Research
By Faculty
TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: The Language Group
Nygaard
Mon 11:30 - 1:00

Maximum Enrollment: 10 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: This is a research seminar in which students, faculty, and post-docs discuss their work and recent papers on topics related to language including speech processing, symbolic representation, word learning, non-verbal communication, and categorization from behavioral and neuroscientific, adult and developmental perspectives.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Mechanisms of Learning
Dilks
Hampton
Mon 1:00-2:15

Maximum Enrollment: 8 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: SCCAN Reading Group
Barsalou
Hamann
Mon 11:00-12:00

Maximum Enrollment: 15 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: TBA

Particulars: Pass/fail only.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R:Thought and Language
Fivush
Wolff 
TBA

Maximum Enrollment: 10 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group
Wallen
Tues 4:00-5:30

Maximum Enrollment: 10

Content: This seminar will focus on discussion of primary literature and student presentations in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology.

Texts: Selected readings from scientific journals may be assigned for individual sessions.

Particulars: NAB graduate students interested in behavioral endocrinology and neuroendocrinology are especially encouraged to enroll.  Graduate students from other programs are welcome as well. Content will vary from semester to semester and the course can be repeated for credit.

Specifics: Open to all Psychology graduate students. Undergraduate and other students require permission from the Instructor prior to enrollment.


PSYCHOLOGY 730R: Culture and Cognition
Dilks
Lourenco 
Rochat
Fri 1:00-2:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: Research, reading (the most current, as well as seminar papers), and discussion on group on perception, cognition, and social cognition from infancy to adulthood, examining behavioral, neuroscientific, and cross-cultural data.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Clinical Supervision: Assessment Practicum
Abramowitz
Cale
Duke
McDowell
Messina 
Snow


Maximum Enrollment: 
5 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: Supervised clinical work in psychological assessment.

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Clinical Supervision: Therapy Practicum
Abramowitz
Cale
Duke
McDowell
Messina 
Snow


Maximum Enrollment: 
5 (By permission of the Instructor only).

Content: Supervised clinical work in psychological therapy.

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Messina
TBA

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Community Practicum
Walker 
TBA

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750: Evidence-Based Intervention Family & School Based
Abramowitz
TBA

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 750L: Assessment Practicum I
Abramowitz
TBA

Particulars: Must be a graduate student in clinical psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: fMRI Concepts
Dilks
Treadway 
TH 10:00-12:30

Maximum Enrollment: 15. Permission of the Instructor is required prior to enrollment.

Content: This graduate course is an introduction to how functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods and experimental designs are applied in the areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience research. The focus of the course will be on how cognitive and clinical neuroscience questions are translated into fMRI experiments and on critical analysis and interpretation of the fMRI literature. Representative research articles associated with each major topic will be discussed. The overall goal by the end of the course is for students to be able to interpret and critique published fMRI studies, design basic studies to address their own research questions, and to have a basis for going on to more advanced topics in fMRI design and analysis. Note: This course focuses on theoretical and conceptual issues associated with design and interpretation of fMRI studies. Specific instruction on how to use various imaging analysis programs to analyze raw fMRI experimental data will not be covered.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: Social Psychology: Context and Processes
Walker
Tues 5:00-8:00

Maximum Enrollment: 15 (Permission of the Instructor is required prior to enrollment).

Content: This course will cover the field of social psychology with an emphasis on the following general areas of investigation: 1) Social class and the social contexts that influence human behavior and attitudes, 2) stereotypes, bias, and stigma, 3) altruism & aggression, 4) social cognition, perception and dissonance, 5) group processes and conformity, and 6) social-affective neuroscience.


PSYCHOLOGY 770R: William James Seminar: Psychological Principles, Religious Experience, and Pragmatism (Same as RLPC 710K and EDS 771V)
Snarey
Thurs 2:30-5:30

Maximum Enrollment: 5

William James (1842-1910) is variously considered to be the founding father of American psychology, the foremost and most American philosopher, and the most important pioneer in the psychological study of religion.  This course embraces all three faces of James.  The seminar begins with a psychological biography; then seminar members will become familiar first-hand with James’s general psychology and educational psychology by studying selected chapters from his classic volumes,Psychology: The Briefer Course (1892) and Talks to Teachers on Psychology (1899).  Similar attention will be given to James’s philosophical pragmatism by reading essays from his classic volumes, especially Pragmatism (1907) and A Pluralistic Universe(1909).  Building on this biographical-psychological-philosophical foundation, the penultimate section of the seminar involves a close reading of James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902), which is often regarded as the greatest classic in the psychological study of religion. Finally we will review a collection of critical essays written by James’s detractors and assess what we may have missed and what they may have missed as we all come to terms with this giant in American intellectual history.

Obligations:  The course will be conducted as a readings seminar in which we will focus primarily on James’s original writings.  Course grades will be based on weekly written reflections on the assigned readings or an equivalent assignment (25%), weekly class participation (25%), and a final term paper (50%). 

Texts:
1. Feinstein, H. (1984). Becoming William James. Cornell University Press. ISBN: 978-0801486425.

2. James, W.(1992). William James: Writings 1878-1901. Library of America. ISBN: 978-0940450721.

3. James, W. (1902). The Varieties of Religious Experience. Prometheus. ISBN 1573929816

4. James, W. (1987). William James: Writings 1902-1910. Library of America. ISBN: 978-0940450387.

5. Collected critical essays by James’s detractors (reserves direct).


PSYCHOLOGY 774R: Clinical Research & Training Seminar
Craighead
Wed 9:00-10:30

Content: This is the ongoing research and training seminar of the clinical psychology graduate program. Topics vary from year to year, but include research presentations by students and faculty and theoretical and research-based discussions of clinical issues. Special topics such as ethics, legal questions, social issues, and problems of special populations are also addressed.

Texts: There are no texts, but reading may be assigned in preparation for individual presentations.

Particulars: This course is required for all clinical psychology graduate students during each of their first four years in residence. The course is not open to students outside of the department of psychology.


PSYCHOLOGY 775R: Neuroscience & Animal Behavior Research Seminar 
Bachevalier

Thurs 4:00 –5:30

Content: This seminar serves primarily as a way for graduate students and faculty interested in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior to share their research and ideas. Content varies from semester to semester. The course includes presentations by NAB students and faculty as well as occasional visitors from other departments and universities. Issues in ethics will also be covered.

Particulars: All graduate students registered for the seminar are expected to present a talk or lead a discussion at least once during the academic year. All student presenters receive detailed feedback on their presentation.


PSYCHOLOGY 776R: Cognition and Developmental Issues Seminar 
Lourenco
Wed 12:00-1:00

Content: This course focuses on current findings and theoretical issues in the study of cognition and development.


PSYCHOLOGY 797R: Directed Study 
TBA


PSYCHOLOGY 799R:Doctoral Dissertation Research
TBA